Concerts

Chamber Music Concerts in a beautiful location.

Nantwen’s hall is an excellent space for a small classical music concert. Previous performers have included the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and The Gildas Quartet.

Our concerts sell out quickly and the evening often includes food and drink and opportunities to picnic in our wild gardens.

Our next classical music concert is with Fretwork on the 10th of August at 7.30pm.

THIS CONCERT HAS NOW SOLD OUT… however we are offering bench seats. Just add your name to our waiting list below or give us a call. 01239 820 768 

This engaging group presents a rare classical music concert for Pembrokeshire audiences. The Viol is an instrument that creates a sound world like no other, combine this with the acoustic in our rustic hall and the result will be breathtaking. We anticpate that this concert will sell out so early booking is advised.

 

 

About Fretwork

In 2016, Fretwork celebrated its 30th anniversary. In these last three decades, they have explored the core repertory of great English consort music, from Taverner to Purcell, and made classic recordings against which others are judged.
In addition to this, Fretwork have become known as pioneers of contemporary music for viols, having commissioned over 40 new works. The list of composers is like the role call of the most prominent writers of our time: George Benjamin, Michael Nyman, Sir John Tavener, Gavin Bryars, Elvis Costello, Alexander Goehr, John Woolrich, Orlando Gough, Fabrice Fitch, Peter Sculthorpe, Sally Beamish, Tan Dun, Barry Guy, Andrew Keeling, Thea Musgrave, Simon Bainbridge, Poul Ruders, John Joubert, Duncan Druce & Nico Muhly.
The group now frequently presents programmes consisting entirely of contemporary music.
In 2008, they recorded two tracks on Ryuichi Sakamoto’s album ‘Out of Noise’. They now tour the United States most years, and made their Carnegie Hall debut in February of 2010.
In that year, they also curated a week-long concert series of concerts at Kings Place. The culmination of this week was the world premier of ‘The World Encompassed’ by Orlando Gough, a 70-minute piece describing in musical terms Drake’s circumnavigation of the globe in 1577-80.
In 2011, The National Centre for Early Music, in collaboration with the BBC, hosted a competition for young composers to create a four-minute piece for Fretwork. They workshopped the shortlisted pieces at the NCEM in York in October, and then the winning entries were premiered in Kings Place in December 2011.
The following year, they premiered ‘My Days’ for The Hilliard Ensemble & Fretwork by one of today’s most exciting young composers – Nico Muhly – in Wigmore Hall; while 2013 was their busiest year for a decade: they played no fewer than ten concerts in London’s major chamber music halls: Wigmore Hall, Kings Place, Cadogan Hall & the Royal College of Music.
In 2014 they continued to concentrate on the music of John Dowland with a major tour of the UK with one of todays greatest tenors: Ian Bostridge.  They also spent a week in the Britten Studio in Aldeburgh re-working Orlando Gough’s ‘The World Encompassed’, to incorporate a spoken narrative drawn from contemporary accounts.
‘Slow: an In Nomine” by Nico Muhly was premiered in 2015 at Kings Place in London, and they collaborated with celebrated actor Simon Callow in the revised version of The World Encompassed and recorded it for Signum Classics.
They celebrated their 30th anniversary with a star-studded concert at Kings Place in June of 2016; and recorded four new albums, including The World Encompassed, and later that year they made their longest tour of America, taking in the USA, Canada & Colombia.
In 2018 they performed and recorded a programme celebrating the music of Michael Nyman – who is 75 in 2019 – with the exceptional counter-tenor, Iestyn Davies; and in 2019 they will tour North America with this programme.
Also in 2019, they begin a series of concerts at Wigmore Hall presenting the greatest English consort music from the Golden Age – six concerts ranging from Cornyshe to Purcell.